0 items in basket Checkout

Thirst 4 Function Blog

My Uncensored Opinion On Muscle Balance And Life Balance For That Matter…

I keep hearing people (and myself for
that matter) saying a particular phrase.

and it’s time to┬ástop it.

And I’m calling you out on it too ­čśë

What’s the phrase?

Well it’s this annoying sucker…

“It’s all about finding the work-life
balance”

I bet you’ve heard it a million times
and probably said yourself a fair few.

This idea that there is just the right
amount
of time to be working

and then the rest of the time you
can be living life.

I’m slowly (I’m a slow learner)
realising that this is total BS on a
number of levels.

Firstly, on a simple level it tends to
imply that when you’re working you’re not
living life and/or enjoying yourself.

Let’s be honest…

If this is the case you’re screwed anyway

doesn’t matter if you somehow manage to
find that elusive balance

You’re actually spending a significant
part of your time doing something you
don’t enjoy just to earn a living.

No good can come of this.

Secondly, and perhaps more importantly

Balance in this sense implies some sort
of static equilibrium…

…where you have just the right amount
of time on each side of the work : life
equation.

Never going to happen.

reality looks much more like a
multidirectional work : life SEESAW

Sometimes you need / want to throw
yourself deep into the work side of
this equation

—> giving all your time, thoughts and
energy to doing what you love –>your
vocation

And at other moments your whole being is
focussed on something else:

family, friends, sport etc.

and NO these won’t add up to equal parts
over a given time

If you give it just a moment’s thought
you know it just doesn’t work like that.

Most hours, days, weeks, months and even
years of your life will be drastically
skewed in one direction.

So constantly trying to find this
‘balance’ will only leave you WISHING
you had spent (or realising you should
now spend) more time on the OTHER…

Leaving you in constant state of
FRUSTRATION.

Low and behold this parallels exactly
the problem with the traditional view
of balance in a movement sense:

Take the futility of working on ‘muscle
balance’
for example

Trying to match quads with hamstrings??

Never going to happen —>

That’s a simplistic model of muscles and
motor function which bares little if any
resemblance to how we actually function.

You see in almost every day to day
function you can name quads and
hamstrings are working together in
synergy doing the same thing.

That is –> decelerating motion in 2 or
more planes so they can assist with creating
motion in a different direction.

Why on earth would you want quads to
equal hamstrings?

Just compare anatomy of these 2
arbitrary groups if you want to see how
ridiculous that would actually be.

Now think of balance in its usual
setting i.e not falling over.

What exactly is the point of learning to
stand motionless on one leg with your
eyes closed?

Surely you wouldn’t expect this to be
the best way to reduce the chances of
you falling over while performing a dynamic
movement like running or walking???

The ultimate test of balance is not
trying to find that perfect still point

But the ability to be going full-tilt in
one direction AND being able to retain
control of that motion and then redirect
it in a different direction as required.

Sound a bit like what you need to
do to be successful at work, family,
sport and life in general?

In fact have you ever met or listened to
any successful individual who had found
the perfect a state of static balance
between all elements of their life??

Or were they just awesome at going full
tilt in one direction

and then able to control this momentum
to redirect their energy in another
direction as required?

^^ I’ll leave you to ponder that ^^

Speak soon

Chris ‘full tilt’ Wilkes

PS only 2 spots on our Functional
Spine and Pelvis course left

come and join us to find out if your
core is in balance…. or NOT.

Click here to book:

http://thirst4function.com/courses/

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *